Employment rate reaches joint record high

Economy & Politics | Employment & Skills | Latest News


The employment rate in the UK is at 75.3%, which is up from 74.6% compared to a year ago, and the joint highest since records began.

Figures released by the Office for National Statistics show that 402,000 more people have moved into employment in the last year.

The unemployment rate (4.3%) has not been lower since 1975, and the number of people out of work is down by 127,000 compared to a year ago.

The number of people not working and not looking for work fell by 158,000 on the year. The rate has not been lower since records began.

Since 2010, over 70% of employment growth has been in permanent roles, with around 70% in higher skilled work.

Secretary of State for Work and Pensions Esther McVey said: “Getting a job means securing an income for a family and the chance to build a better future. That’s why up and down the country we are doing all we can to help people into work.

“From next month, we’ll be taking thousands more people out of paying tax and also increasing the National Living Wage, benefiting those on the lowest pay and making sure they keep more of what they earn.

“In fact by raising the National Living Wage we have ensured that the lowest earners have seen their wages grow by almost 7% above inflation since 2015.”

The amount of money people can earn before they start paying income tax will rise in April 2018 from £11,500 to £11,850.

From 1 April 2018, the National Living Wage – the minimum paid to employees aged over 25 – will rise from £7.50 an hour to £7.83, equating to a £600 annual pay rise for full-time workers on basic pay.

Today’s figures also showed that since 2010, the number of people in employment has increased by around 3.2 million. 83.4% of employment in the UK is in the private sector, with 16.6% in the public sector.

Female employment rate is at a record high of 70.9%, with over 15 million women in work – a rise of 234,000 on the year.

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