How to watch the Euros at work – comprehensive employers guide and workers rights

Employment & Skills | How To | Sport

football

This summer people are gearing up for a festival of non-stop sport. Following the 2020 European Football Championships, we then have the Tokyo Olympics.

Naturally, a lot of the coverage will be televised during the working day, so what does that mean for employees in the UK? Should they be allowed to watch it, will they, and do they have any worker’s rights?

Officeology, a workplace solutions company has created a comprehensive guide for companies regarding watching the Euros at the workplace. In this article, they’ve explored whether people in the UK will be watching Euro 2020 during their working day and how employees can support their staff, win or lose. They’ve also answered some essential questions about workers’ rights when it comes to watching the games at work.

Will people be watching Euro 2020 during their working day?

We’ve surveyed more than 1500 members of the British public to find out whether they’d be watching the Euros at any point during their work day.

Almost 1 in 4 (24%) of us said they will watch the Euros while at work. While the majority is happy not to tune in, it’s important for employers up and down the country to recognise how keen footy fans are to watch some of Europe’s best players in action.

With England playing Germany in their last 16 knockout match at 5pm on Tuesday the 29th of June, it’s likely that even more will finish their day early and tune in.

Digital Marketing agency NOVOS is one of these companies who are happy to let their employees watch the football during work hours. Co-Founder Sam Hurley, said this about the decision: “The Euros is a great way for employees to unwind during the working day. Especially when working from home it’s super important that people can escape their laptops for a while, and what better way than cheering your team on!

“Although we already have flexible working hours at NOVOS, our team understands their responsibilities and what’s required from them so we’re happy for them to take an hour or two out of the day now and again.

“If it makes our staff happier then we’re all for it, and I’d massively recommend other companies do the same!”

How can employers make the most of Euro 2020?

1. Allowing your employees to watch Euros will boost morale

Boosting and maintaining a great team morale should be at the forefront of any employer’s mind at the moment. The last 14 months have been hard on almost everyone at some point, so what better way to uplift certain employees by letting them relax for a few hours in the day to cheer their team on!

If people are coming into the office why not put the matches on the big screens, or encourage football fans in your business to watch the games together!

2. Encourage accountability by introducing flexible working hours during the tournament

One way your team can watch the football, yet ensure that they are still fully responsible for their work, is by implementing flexible working. Introducing flexible working hours means employees will view their responsibilities from a project-based perspective rather than from a day-to-day, or a ‘time’ point of view.

When approaching work from a project-based stance, individual accountability will increase as employees become increasingly aware of what needs to be achieved, rather than how long they should be working.

By encouraging accountability, not only will your staff get to enjoy the football but it should improve their time management and scheduling skills. You may also see less holiday requests as people don’t need to take one or two days off to watch their teams play!

3. Don’t forget, some people will still do work!

While it’s guaranteed that there will be some sports fans on your team, it’s also inevitable that some people will prefer to just crack on with their work!

NOVOS founder Sam Hurley adds: “If there are other companies out there who are undecided about whether to let their staff watch lunchtime or early evening matches, all I’d say is we’ve actually only found half a dozen members of a 30-strong team, are keen to watch every minute! What’s more, is that some people will still work while they watch the football – there are some admin tasks that don’t require too much thought, it’s all about prioritising and time management!”.

4. Euro 2020 is a great chance to promote inclusivity and celebrate multiculturalism.

Is there a better way to celebrate than international sporting events? Every company in the UK is likely to have an employee with a significant link to one or more countries participating in the tournament. Euro 2020 is a fantastic opportunity to celebrate culture, with offices even hosting social events when two of the team’s nationalities are playing against one another. People bring in food, drink and have a chance to show their passion for their country – a true celebration of culture!

Do workers have any rights to watch the Euros?

In short, no…but you can ask your boss for time off! It depends on several factors, such as your company policy, as well as your own workload and your relationship with your manager. One possibility is to book a day’s holiday and make a full day of it – however, you may want to reserve it for another time!

What happens if you pull a sickie?

It may seem a little coincidental if you have a sick day at the same time as your countries knockout Euros match! If your boss knows you well they’ll probably latch onto your thinking and we’d certainly advise against faking being ill.

Am I legally allowed to watch it at work?

Before you start streaming the game at your desk, it’s best to have a look at your contract or ask your manager whether it’s ok – some internet networks may start slowing down if you stream and it’ll be obvious who the guilty culprit is! If you’re working in the office then some businesses will happily put it on the TV, so no need to sneakily stream!

Did you enjoy reading this content?  To get more great content like this subscribe to our magazine

Reader's Comments

Comments related to the current article

Leave a comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *