Plans unveiled to create cultural hub for Salford

Creative Industries | Education | Leisure & Tourism | North West | Property & Construction

Maxwell Hall

Plans have been unveiled for a project to revive a historic music venue and create a modern cultural hub for Salford.

The redevelopment of the University of Salford’s historic Maxwell Hall is aimed at creating a world-class entertainment and cultural venue for both students and the wider Salford and Greater Manchester communities.

Architects Flanagan Lawrence have been appointed to develop the final designs.

Maxwell Hall is part of the ambitious £800m Salford Crescent Masterplan that has been jointly developed by the University of Salford and Salford City Council to outline the vision for a new city district in the heart of Salford.

Maxwell Hall has a rich history and has hosted a huge range of acts including the Smiths, Pulp and The Charlatans. The aim is to attract acts of that calibre in the future, putting Salford back on the music venue map.

Huw Williams, COO at the University of Salford said: “This is a very exciting announcement for the University and the whole of the city. We are committed to bringing Maxwell Hall back to life, to create a vibrant space for the benefit of the whole community as well as our students.

“As the centre-piece of our campus and given its proximity to the A6, the Salford Crescent Masterplan has identified the need to retain and redevelop Maxwell Hall as a cultural and performance venue, for both students and the general public, as well as creating new spaces for conferences, events, short courses and executive education.”

While the University will be investing a large amount of capital in the project, matched funding will need to be raised for part of the estimated £15m project costs.

Architects Flanagan Lawrence have previously been involved with the Fire Station Auditorium in Sunderland, the Performing Arts centre for the Royal Welsh College of Music and Drama in Cardiff, and the Laidlaw Music Centre for the University of St Andrews.

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