Womble Bond Dickinson partner with The Prince’s Trust to help young entrepreneurs

Education | Growth | Legal | South West

Womble Bond Dickinson

Transatlantic law firm Womble Bond Dickinson and youth charity The Prince’s Trust have organised legal clinics to support young entrepreneurs looking to set up and grow their business.

The aim of the legal clinics was to deliver insightful and tailored workshops to support small and emerging businesses in understanding key legal issues, and ensuring entrepreneurs are well equipped to respond to the challenges they will be faced with as business leaders.

The entrepreneurs attended the clinics with well-considered questions ranging from contract law and data protection, through to IP and employment.

Commercial lawyer Imogen Armstrong from Womble Bond Dickinson, supported by Associates Laura Coombes and Georgie Morgan-Giles, met with the entrepreneurs to guide them through their thought processes and to offer ideas for obtaining further information regarding their specific issues.

The legal clinics follow the success of Womble Bond Dickinson’s Lunchbox Learning sessions hosted last year in aid of The Prince’s Trust, where the same entrepreneurs had received guidance on GDPR, leases and contract clauses, ensuring they receive comprehensive legal advice and continued support from the firm.

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This year’s sessions took place at the end of March, with plans to roll out the scheme in more Womble Bond Dickinson offices.

Jonathan Bower, Partner and Head of CSR in Womble Bond Dickinson’s Bristol office said: “Following the very positive response we had last year on our Lunchbox Learning sessions, we wanted to continue supporting The Prince’s Trust and their young entrepreneurs by providing tailored, relevant and clear legal guidance in a relaxed and friendly environment.

“Our team was very pleased to participate in the event and we were impressed by those who attended; they already had a good idea of what they needed to have in place and asked very pertinent questions.

“We recognise that fund raising is not always the main focus to support charities and as business professionals, we have an important skill set which we want to share with young people and entrepreneurs to help them progress and succeed.”

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